New Drugs / Therapies

New Drugs / Therapies

Below you will find information and links to new cancer therapies or recent FDA changes of approvals of medication offered by NOS Corporate Members! P.I. Drugs and Products will stay online for 12 months from approval date.  Updated 1/13/2022 CCG

 

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda® (pembrolizumab): Updated Indication

Keytruda® (pembrolizumab)
May, 2022

Merck would like to inform you that the FDA has approved KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) Injection 100 mg, as a single agent, for the treatment of patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma that is microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR), as determined by an FDA-approved test, who have disease progression following prior systemic therapy in any setting and are not candidates for curative surgery or radiation.

Information on FDA-approved tests used for patient selection is available at http://www.fda.gov/CompanionDiagnostics. FDA=Food and Drug Administration.

For more information, click here to read the rest of the press release.

New FDA Approval for LYNPARZA® (olaparib)

LYNPARZA® (olaparib)
March, 2022

I am excited to announce that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new indication for LYNPARZA® (olaparib) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, high-risk early breast cancer who have been treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

LYNPARZA is the first and only targeted adjuvant therapy with an FDA-approved indication specifically for patients with gBRCAm,* HER2-negative, high-risk† early breast cancer for patients who have been treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy.

FDA approval was based on the results from the OlympiA phase 3 trial, which was presented during the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Please see the attached documents for more information regarding the use of LYNPARZA in this new indication:

  • LYNPARZA® (olaparib) EMR Treatment Plan

This document is a customizable draft treatment plan for implementation into EMR or papertreatment plans. The information contained in the attachment is derived from the full Prescribing Information for LYNPARZA

  • LYNPARZA® (olaparib) Medical Policy Considerations

Intended to provide example coveragepolicy language for LYNPARZA, it is not meant to provide clinical advice concerning any pharmaceutical products or medical procedures

  • LYNPARZA® (olaparib) Sell Sheet: Contains information regarding the study design, efficacy, andsafety data from the OlympiA phase 3 trial

 

This is the eighth indication approved for LYNPARZA in the US. See Important Safety Information below.

For more information regarding the approval, please see AstraZeneca’s press release announcing the news.

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or to request a presentation.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

There are no contraindications for LYNPARZA.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Myelodysplastic Syndrome/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (MDS/AML): Occurred in approximately 1.5% of patients exposed to LYNPARZA monotherapy, and the majority of events had a fatal outcome. The median duration of therapy in patients who developed MDS/AML was 2 years (range: <6 months to >10 years). All of these patients had previous chemotherapy with platinum agents and/or other DNA-damaging agents, including radiotherapy.

Do not start LYNPARZA until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (≤Grade 1). Monitor complete blood count for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment. For prolonged hematological toxicities, interrupt LYNPARZA and monitor blood count weekly until recovery.

If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample for cytogenetics. Discontinue LYNPARZA if MDS/AML is confirmed.

Pneumonitis: Occurred in 0.8% of patients exposed to LYNPARZA monotherapy, and some cases were fatal. If patients present with new or worsening respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and fever, or a radiological abnormality occurs, interrupt LYNPARZA treatment and initiate prompt investigation. Discontinue LYNPARZA if pneumonitis is confirmed and treat patient appropriately.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, LYNPARZA can cause fetal harm. A pregnancy test is recommended for females of reproductive potential prior to initiating treatment.

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus and to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose.

Males

Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential or who are pregnant to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months following the last dose of LYNPARZA and to not donate sperm during this time.

 

ADVERSE REACTIONS—Adjuvant Treatment of gBRCAm, HER2-Negative, High-Risk Early Breast Cancer

Most common adverse reactions (Grades 1-4) in ≥10% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: nausea (57%), fatigue (including asthenia) (42%), anemia (24%), vomiting (23%), headache (20%), diarrhea (18%), leukopenia (17%), neutropenia (16%), decreased appetite (13%), dysgeusia (12%), dizziness (11%), and stomatitis (10%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities (Grades 1-4) in ≥25% of patients who received LYNPARZA in the adjuvant setting for OlympiA were: decrease in lymphocytes (77%), increase in mean corpuscular volume (67%), decrease in hemoglobin (65%), decrease in leukocytes (64%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (39%).

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Anticancer Agents: Clinical studies of LYNPARZA with other myelosuppressive anticancer agents, including DNA-damaging agents, indicate a potentiation and prolongation of myelosuppressive toxicity.

CYP3A Inhibitors: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors when using LYNPARZA. If a strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitor must be coadministered, reduce the dose of LYNPARZA. Advise patients to avoid grapefruit, grapefruit juice, Seville oranges, and Seville orange juice during LYNPARZA treatment.

CYP3A Inducers: Avoid coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers when using LYNPARZA.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Lactation: No data are available regarding the presence of olaparib in human milk, its effects on the breastfed infant or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed infant, advise a lactating woman not to breastfeed during treatment with LYNPARZA and for 1 month after receiving the final dose.

Pediatric Use: The safety and efficacy of LYNPARZA have not been established in pediatric patients.

Hepatic Impairment: No adjustment to the starting dose is required in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification A and B). There are no data in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification C).

Renal Impairment: No dosage modification is recommended in patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr 51-80 mL/min estimated by Cockcroft-Gault). In patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr 31-50 mL/min), reduce the dose of LYNPARZA to 200 mg twice daily. There are no data in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (CLcr ≤30 mL/min).

INDICATION

LYNPARZA is a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor indicated:

For the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious gBRCAm, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative high-risk early breast cancer who have been treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for LYNPARZA.

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

You may report side effects related to AstraZeneca products by clicking here. If you prefer to report these to the FDA, either visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Regards,

Amy Kelly

National Oncology Account Director

US Oncology Access Strategy

West Region

AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

One Medimmune Way, Gaithersburg, MD, 20878

Mobile: 612-810-4591

EmailAmy.Kelly@astrazeneca.com

 

gBRCAm=germline breast cancer susceptibility gene-mutated; PARPi=poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor; pCR=pathologic complete response.

*Select patients for this indication based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic.

†For patients who received prior neoadjuvant chemotherapy, high-risk was defined as non-pCR in TNBC and as

non-pCR with CPS&EG score ≥3 in HR-positive, HER2-negative disease. For patients who received prior adjuvant         chemotherapy, high-risk was defined as ≥pN1 or ≥pN0 with ≥pT2 in TNBC and as ≥4 positive lymph nodes in HR-positive, HER2-negative disease.

For more information, please visit www.lynparzahcp.com.

Reference: LYNPARZA® (olaparib) [prescribing information]. Wilmington, DE: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; 2022.

This product information is intended for US health care professionals only.

LYNPARZA is a registered trademark of the AstraZeneca group of companies.

©2022 AstraZeneca. All rights reserved. US-59344 Last Updated 3/22

Attachments

 

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda® (pembrolizumab): Expanded Indication

KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab)
January, 2022

Merck would like to inform you that the FDA has approved KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) Injection 100 mg for the adjuvant treatment of adult and pediatric (12 years and older) patients with stage IIB or IIC melanoma following complete resection.

To read the complete expanded indication, please click here!

Corporate Member Update: Pfizer- new FDA-approved indication for XALKORI® (crizotinib) capsules

XALKORI® (crizotinib)
January, 2021

Pfizer Oncology is proud to announce a new FDA-approved indication for XALKORI® (crizotinib) capsules. The following information is available for State Society review:

Read the Full Prescribing Information

Read the Press Release

Corporate Member Taiho- New Copy Program

Taiho Oncology
January, 2020

Making Access Easier for Patients

Eligible patients may pay $0 per treatment cylce with Taiho Oncology Co-Pay Assistance Program.

To determine patient eligibility, go to TaihoOncologyCopay.com or call 844-824-4648.

If circumstances determine a patient to be significantly underinsured, then Taiho Oncology, Inc. will asssess the patient for support under the Taiho Oncology Patient Assistance Program.

You may be eligible if you:

  • Have commercial prescription insurance coverage
  • Use a specialty pharmacy
  • Use a hospital outpatient pharmacy
  • Receive your medicine from a doctor's office

You may not be eligible if you:

  • Are reimbursed under Medicaid, a Medicare drug benefit program, Tricare, or other state or federal programs
  • Reside outside of the US, Puerto Rico, or US territories

Restrictions and Eligibility:

Offer valid in the US, Puerto Rico, and US territories only. Only valid for patients with private insurance. Offer not valid for prescriptions reimbursed under Medicaid, a Medicare drug benefit plan, Tricare, or other federal or state programs (such as medical assistance programs). If the patient is eligible for drug benefits under any such program, this offer is not valid and the patient cannot use this offer. By presenting or accepting this benefit, patient and pharmacist agree not to submit claim for reimbursement under the above programs. Patient further agrees to comply with any and all terms of his or her health insurance contract requiring notification to his or her payer of the existence and/or value of this offer. It is illegal to or offer to sell, purchase, or trade this benefit. Maximum reimbursement limits apply; patient out-of-pocket expense may vary. Taiho Oncology, Inc., reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend this offer at any time without notice.

11/2019

 

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda®

KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab)
December, 2021

Adjuvant Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma
KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at intermediate-high or high risk of recurrence following nephrectomy, or following nephrectomy and resection of
metastatic lesions.

Selected Safety Information

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

KEYTRUDA is a monoclonal antibody that belongs to a class of drugs that bind to either the programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) or the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, thereby removing inhibition of the immune response, potentially breaking peripheral tolerance and inducing immune-mediated adverse reactions. Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue, can affect more than one body system simultaneously, and can occur at any time after starting treatment or after discontinuation of treatment. Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed here may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.
Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Evaluate liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.
Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity of the immune-mediated adverse reaction. In general, if KEYTRUDA requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to
2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.4% (94/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including fatal (0.1%), Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (1.3%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 67% (63/94) of patients. Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 1.3% (36) and withholding in 0.9% (26) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 23% had recurrence. Pneumonitis resolved in 59% of the 94 patients.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may present with diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 1.7% (48/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (1.1%), and Grade 2 (0.4%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 69% (33/48); additional immunosuppressant therapy was required in 4.2% of patients. Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.5% (15) and withholding in 0.5% (13) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 23% had recurrence. Colitis resolved in 85% of the 48 patients.

Hepatotoxicity and Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

KEYTRUDA as a Single Agent

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 0.7% (19/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.4%), and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 68% (13/19) of patients; additional immunosuppressant therapy was required in 11% of patients. Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.2% (6) and withholding in 0.3% (9) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, none had recurrence. Hepatitis resolved in 79% of the 19 patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Adrenal Insufficiency

KEYTRUDA can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For Grade 2 or higher, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.8% (22/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.3%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 77% (17/22) of patients; of these, the majority remained on systemic corticosteroids. Adrenal insufficiency led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) and withholding in 0.3% (8) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Hypophysitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate hormone replacement as indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (17/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.2%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 94% (16/17) of patients; of these,
the majority remained on systemic corticosteroids. Hypophysitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.1% (4) and withholding in 0.3% (7) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Thyroid Disorders

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement for hypothyroidism or institute medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (16/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 2 (0.3%). None discontinued, but KEYTRUDA was withheld in <0.1% (1) of patients.
Hyperthyroidism occurred in 3.4% (96/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (0.1%) and Grade 2 (0.8%). It led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (2) and withholding in 0.3% (7) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement. Hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (237/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (0.1%) and Grade 2 (6.2%). It led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) and withholding in 0.5% (14) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement. The majority of patients with hypothyroidism required long-term thyroid hormone replacement.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM), Which Can Present With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Withhold KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Type 1 DM occurred in 0.2% (6/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA. It led to permanent discontinuation in <0.1% (1) and withholding of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis With Renal Dysfunction

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated nephritis. Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.3% (9/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.1%), and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 89% (8/9) of patients. Nephritis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.1% (3) and withholding in 0.1% (3) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, none had recurrence. Nephritis resolved in 56% of the 9 patients.

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, has occurred with anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions occurred in 1.4% (38/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (1%) and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 40% (15/38) of patients. These reactions led to permanent discontinuation in 0.1% (2) and withholding of KEYTRUDA in 0.6% (16) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 6% had recurrence. The reactions resolved in 79% of the 38 patients.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received KEYTRUDA or were reported with the use of other anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions. Cardiac/Vascular: Myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; Nervous System: Meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; Ocular: Uveitis, iritis and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss; Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis, to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue: Myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae, including renal failure), arthritis (1.5%), polymyalgia rheumatica; Endocrine: Hypoparathyroidism; Hematologic/Immune: Hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

KEYTRUDA can cause severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions, including hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis, which have been reported in 0.2% of 2799 patients receiving KEYTRUDA. Monitor for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion for Grade 1 or Grade 2 reactions. For Grade 3 or Grade 4 reactions, stop infusion and permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic HSCT before or after anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute and chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments and allogeneic HSCT. Follow patients closely for evidence of these complications
and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit vs risks of using anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments prior to or after an
allogeneic HSCT.

Increased Mortality in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

In trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of KEYTRUDA to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of these patients with an anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatment in this combination is not recommended outside of controlled trials.

Embryofetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action, KEYTRUDA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise women of this potential risk. In females of reproductive potential, verify pregnancy status prior to initiating KEYTRUDA and advise them to use effective contraception during treatment and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

In KEYNOTE-564, when KEYTRUDA was administered as a single agent for the adjuvant treatment of renal cell carcinoma, serious adverse reactions occurred in 20% of patients receiving KEYTRUDA; the serious adverse reactions (≥1%) were acute kidney injury, adrenal insufficiency, pneumonia, colitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis (1% each). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 0.2% including 1 case of pneumonia. Discontinuation of KEYTRUDA due to adverse reactions occurred in 21% of 488 patients; the most common (≥1%) were increased ALT (1.6%), colitis (1%), and adrenal insufficiency (1%). The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were musculoskeletal pain (41%), fatigue (40%), rash (30%), diarrhea (27%), pruritus (23%), and hypothyroidism (21%). 

Lactation

Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 4 months after the final dose.

ALT=alanine aminotransferase.

Before prescribing KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) Injection 100 mg, please read the Prescribing Information. The Medication Guide also is available.

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda®

KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab)
December, 2021

Merck announces that KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), in combination with chemotherapy, with or without bevacizumab, has been approved for the first-line treatment of patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer whose tumors express programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) (combined positive score [CPS] ≥1) as determined by an FDA-approved test.

To read the full press release, please click here!

Corporate Member Update- Lilly VERZENIO® (abemaciclib)

VERZENIO® (abemaciclib)
November, 2021

NOTICE OF ADDITIONAL INDICATION APPROVAL: VERZENIO® (abemaciclib) 50|100|150|200 mg tablets

Eli Lilly and Company is pleased to announce that on October 12, 2021, the FDA approved Verzenio in combination with endocrine therapy (tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, node-positive, early breast cancer at high risk of recurrence and a Ki-67 score ≥20% as determined by an FDA approved test.

For additional information, please see the press release here.

If you would like to discuss the clinical information associated with this newly approved treatment option in more detail, please feel free to contact me via email or call 402-237-1038 to schedule a time.

VERZENIO® is a kinase inhibitor indicated:

 

in combination with endocrine therapy (tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, node-positive, early breast cancer at high risk of recurrence and a Ki-67 score ≥20% as determined by an FDA approved test.
in combination with an aromatase inhibitor as initial endocrine-based therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal women, and men, with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer.
in combination with fulvestrant for the treatment of adult patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer with disease progression following endocrine therapy.
as monotherapy for the treatment of adult patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer with disease progression following endocrine therapy and prior chemotherapy in the metastatic setting.

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR VERZENIO® (abemaciclib)

 

Severe diarrhea associated with dehydration and infection occurred in patients treated with Verzenio. Across four clinical trials in 3691 patients, diarrhea occurred in 81 to 90% of patients who received Verzenio. Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 8 to 20% of patients receiving Verzenio. Most patients experienced diarrhea during the first month of Verzenio treatment. The median time to onset of the first diarrhea event ranged from 6 to 8 days; and the median duration of Grade 2 and Grade 3 diarrhea ranged from 6 to 11 days and 5 to 8 days, respectively. Across trials, 19 to 26% of patients with diarrhea required a Verzenio dose interruption and 13 to 23% required a dose reduction.

 

Instruct patients to start antidiarrheal therapy, such as loperamide, at the first sign of loose stools, increase oral fluids, and notify their healthcare provider for further instructions and appropriate follow-up. For Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, or diarrhea that requires hospitalization, discontinue Verzenio until toxicity resolves to ≤Grade 1, and then resume Verzenio at the next lower dose.

 

Neutropenia, including febrile neutropenia and fatal neutropenic sepsis, occurred in patients treated with Verzenio. Across four clinical trials in 3691 patients, neutropenia occurred in 37 to 46% of patients receiving Verzenio. A Grade ≥3 decrease in neutrophil count (based on laboratory findings) occurred in 19 to 32% of patients receiving Verzenio. Across trials, the median time to first episode of Grade ≥3 neutropenia ranged from 29 to 33 days, and the median duration of Grade ≥3 neutropenia ranged from 11 to 16 days. Febrile neutropenia has been reported in <1% of patients exposed to Verzenio across trials.  Two deaths due to neutropenic sepsis were observed in MONARCH 2. Inform patients to promptly report any episodes of fever to their healthcare provider.

 

Monitor complete blood counts prior to the start of Verzenio therapy, every 2 weeks for the first 2 months, monthly for the next 2 months, and as clinically indicated. Dose interruption, dose reduction, or delay in starting treatment cycles is recommended for patients who develop Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia.

 

Severe, life-threatening, or fatal interstitial lung disease (ILD) or pneumonitis can occur in patients treated with Verzenio and other CDK4/6 inhibitors. In Verzenio-treated patients in EBC (monarchE), 3% of patients experienced ILD or pneumonitis of any grade: 0.4% were Grade 3 or 4 and there was one fatality (0.1%). In Verzenio-treated patients in MBC (MONARCH 1, MONARCH 2, MONARCH 3), 3.3% of Verzenio-treated patients had ILD or pneumonitis of any grade: 0.6% had Grade 3 or 4, and 0.4% had fatal outcomes. Additional cases of ILD or pneumonitis have been observed in the postmarketing setting, with fatalities reported.

 

Monitor patients for pulmonary symptoms indicative of ILD or pneumonitis. Symptoms may include hypoxia, cough, dyspnea, or interstitial infiltrates on radiologic exams. Infectious, neoplastic, and other causes for such symptoms should be excluded by means of appropriate investigations. Dose interruption or dose reduction is recommended in patients who develop persistent or recurrent Grade 2 ILD or pneumonitis. Permanently discontinue Verzenio in all patients with Grade 3 or 4 ILD or pneumonitis.

 

Grade ≥3 increases in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (2 to 6%) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (2 to 3%) were reported in patients receiving Verzenio. Across three clinical trials in 3559 patients (monarchE, MONARCH 2, MONARCH 3), the median time to onset of Grade ≥3 ALT increases ranged from 57 to 87 days and the median time to resolution to Grade <3 was 13 to 14 days. The median time to onset of Grade ≥3 AST increases ranged from 71 to 185 days and the median time to resolution to Grade <3 ranged from 11 to 15 days.

 

Monitor liver function tests (LFTs) prior to the start of Verzenio therapy, every 2 weeks for the first 2 months, monthly for the next 2 months, and as clinically indicated. Dose interruption, dose reduction, dose discontinuation, or delay in starting treatment cycles is recommended for patients who develop persistent or recurrent Grade 2, or any Grade 3 or 4 hepatic transaminase elevation.

 

Venous thromboembolic events (VTE) were reported in 2 to 5% of patients across three clinical trials in 3559 patients treated with Verzenio (monarchE, MONARCH 2, MONARCH 3). VTE included deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pelvic venous thrombosis, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, subclavian and axillary vein thrombosis, and inferior vena cava thrombosis. In clinical trials, deaths due to VTE have been reported in patients treated with Verzenio.

 

Verzenio has not been studied in patients with early breast cancer who had a history of VTE. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and treat as medically appropriate. Dose interruption is recommended for EBC patients with any grade VTE and for MBC patients with a Grade 3 or 4 VTE.

 

Verzenio can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman, based on findings from animal studies and the mechanism of action. In animal reproduction studies, administration of abemaciclib to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis caused teratogenicity and decreased fetal weight at maternal exposures that were similar to the human clinical exposure based on area under the curve (AUC) at the maximum recommended human dose. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Verzenio and for 3 weeks after the last dose. Based on findings in animals, Verzenio may impair fertility in males of reproductive potential. There are no data on the presence of Verzenio in human milk or its effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Advise lactating women not to breastfeed during Verzenio treatment and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants.

 

The most common adverse reactions (all grades, ≥10%) observed in monarchE for Verzenio plus tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor vs tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor, with a difference between arms of ≥2%,  were diarrhea (84% vs 9%), infections (51% vs 39%), neutropenia (46% vs 6%),  fatigue (41% vs 18%),  leukopenia (38% vs 7%),  nausea (30% vs 9%), anemia (24% vs 4%),  headache (20% vs 15%), vomiting (18% vs 4.6%), stomatitis (14% vs 5%), lymphopenia (14% vs 3%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 2%), decreased appetite (12% vs 2.4%), ALT increased (12% vs 6%), AST increased (12% vs 5%), dizziness (11% vs 7%), rash (11% vs 4.5%), and alopecia (11% vs 2.7 %).

   

The most frequently reported ≥5% Grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction that occurred in the Verzenio arm vs the tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor arm of monarchE were neutropenia (19.6% vs 1%), leukopenia (11% vs <1%), diarrhea (8% vs 0.2%), and lymphopenia (5% vs <1%).


Lab abnormalities (all grades; Grade 3 or 4) for monarchE in ≥10% for Verzenio plus tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor with a difference between arms of ≥2% were increased serum creatinine (99% vs 91%; .5% vs <.1%), decreased white blood cells (89% vs 28%; 19.1% vs 1.1%), decreased neutrophil count (84% vs 23%; 18.7% vs 1.9%), anemia (68% vs 17%; 1% vs .1%), decreased lymphocyte count (59% vs 24%; 13.2 % vs 2.5%), decreased platelet count (37% vs 10%; .9% vs .2%), increased ALT (37% vs 24%; 2.6% vs 1.2%), increased AST (31% vs 18%; 1.6% vs .9%), and hypokalemia (11% vs 3.8%; 1.3% vs 0.2%).

 

The most common adverse reactions (all grades, ≥10%) observed in MONARCH 3 for Verzenio plus anastrozole or letrozole vs anastrozole or letrozole, with a difference between arms of ≥2%, were diarrhea (81% vs 30%), fatigue (40% vs 32%), neutropenia (41% vs 2%),  infections (39% vs 29%), nausea (39% vs 20%), abdominal pain (29% vs 12%), vomiting (28% vs 12%), anemia (28% vs 5%), alopecia (27% vs 11%), decreased appetite (24% vs 9%), leukopenia (21% vs 2%), creatinine increased (19% vs 4%), constipation (16% vs 12%), ALT increased (16% vs 7%), AST increased (15% vs 7%), rash (14% vs 5%), pruritus (13% vs 9%), cough (13% vs 9%), dyspnea (12% vs 6%), dizziness (11% vs 9%), weight decreased (10% vs 3.1%), influenza-like illness (10% vs 8%),  and thrombocytopenia (10% vs 2%).

 

The most frequently reported ≥5% Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions that occurred in the Verzenio arm vs the placebo arm of MONARCH 3 were neutropenia (22% vs 1%), diarrhea (9% vs 1.2%), leukopenia (7% vs <1%)), increased ALT (6% vs 2%), and anemia (6% vs 1%).

 

Lab abnormalities (all grades; Grade 3 or 4) for MONARCH 3 in ≥10% for Verzenio plus anastrozole or letrozole with a difference between arms of ≥2%  were increased serum creatinine (98% vs 84%; 2.2% vs 0%), decreased white blood cells (82% vs 27%; 13% vs 0.6%), anemia (82% vs 28%; 1.6% vs 0%), decreased neutrophil count (80% vs 21%; 21.9% vs 2.6%), decreased lymphocyte count (53% vs 26%; 7.6% vs 1.9%), decreased platelet count (36% vs 12%; 1.9% vs 0.6%), increased ALT (48% vs 25%; 6.6% vs 1.9%), and increased AST (37% vs 23%; 3.8% vs 0.6%).

 

The most common adverse reactions (all grades, ≥10%) observed in MONARCH 2 for Verzenio plus fulvestrant vs fulvestrant, with a difference between arms of ≥2%, were diarrhea (86% vs 25%), neutropenia (46% vs 4%), fatigue (46% vs 32%), nausea (45% vs 23%), infections (43% vs 25%), abdominal pain (35% vs 16%), anemia (29% vs 4%), leukopenia (28% vs 2%), decreased appetite (27% vs 12%), vomiting (26% vs 10%), headache (20% vs 15%), dysgeusia (18% vs 2.7%), thrombocytopenia (16% vs 3%), alopecia (16% vs 1.8%), stomatitis (15% vs 10%), ALT increased (13% vs 5%), pruritus (13% vs 6%), cough (13% vs 11%), dizziness (12% vs 6%), AST increased (12% vs 7%), peripheral edema (12% vs 7%), creatinine increased (12% vs <1%), rash (11% vs 4.5%), pyrexia (11% vs 6%), and weight decreased (10% vs 2.2%).

 

The most frequently reported ≥5% Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions that occurred in the Verzenio arm vs the placebo arm of MONARCH 2 were neutropenia (25% vs 1%), diarrhea (13% vs 0.4%), leukopenia (9% vs 0%), anemia (7% vs 1%), and infections (5.7% vs 3.5%).

 

Lab abnormalities (all grades; Grade 3 or 4) for MONARCH 2 in ≥10% for Verzenio plus fulvestrant with a difference between arms of ≥2% were increased serum creatinine (98% vs 74%; 1.2% vs 0%), decreased white blood cells (90% vs 33%; 23.7% vs .9%), decreased neutrophil count (87% vs 30%; 32.5% vs 4.2%), anemia (84% vs 34%; 2.6% vs .5%), decreased lymphocyte count (63% vs 32%; 12.2% vs 1.8%), decreased platelet count (53% vs 15%; 2.1% vs 0%), increased ALT (41% vs 32%; 4.6% vs 1.4%), and increased AST (37% vs 25%; 3.9% vs 4.2%).

 

The most common adverse reactions (all grades, ≥10%) observed in MONARCH 1 with Verzenio were diarrhea (90%), fatigue (65%), nausea (64%), decreased appetite (45%), abdominal pain (39%), neutropenia (37%), vomiting (35%), infections (31%), anemia (25%), thrombocytopenia (20%), headache (20%), cough (19%), constipation (17%), leukopenia (17%), arthralgia (15%), dry mouth (14%), weight decreased (14%), stomatitis (14%), creatinine increased (13%), alopecia (12%), dysgeusia (12%), pyrexia (11%), dizziness (11%), and dehydration (10%).

 

The most frequently reported ≥5% Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions from MONARCH 1 with Verzenio were diarrhea (20%), neutropenia (24%), fatigue (13%), and leukopenia (5%).

 

Lab abnormalities (all grades; Grade 3 or 4) for MONARCH 1 with Verzenio were increased serum creatinine (99%; .8%), decreased white blood cells (91%; 28%), decreased neutrophil count (88%; 26.6%), anemia (69%; 0%), decreased lymphocyte count (42%; 13.8%), decreased platelet count (41%; 2.3%), increased ALT (31%; 3.1%), and increased AST (30%; 3.8%). 

 

Strong and moderate CYP3A inhibitors increased the exposure of abemaciclib plus its active metabolites to a clinically meaningful extent and may lead to increased toxicity. Avoid concomitant use of ketoconazole. Ketoconazole is predicted to increase the AUC of abemaciclib by up to 16-fold. In patients with recommended starting doses of 200 mg twice daily or 150 mg twice daily, reduce the Verzenio dose to 100 mg twice daily with concomitant use of strong CYP3A inhibitors other than ketoconazole. In patients who have had a dose reduction to 100 mg twice daily due to adverse reactions, further reduce the Verzenio dose to 50 mg twice daily with concomitant use of strong CYP3A inhibitors. If a patient taking Verzenio discontinues a strong CYP3A inhibitor, increase the Verzenio dose (after 3 to 5 half-lives of the inhibitor) to the dose that was used before starting the inhibitor. With concomitant use of moderate CYP3A inhibitors, monitor for adverse reactions and consider reducing the Verzenio dose in 50 mg decrements. Patients should avoid grapefruit products.

 

Avoid concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers and consider alternative agents. Coadministration of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers decreased the plasma concentrations of abemaciclib plus its active metabolites and may lead to reduced activity.

 

With severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C), reduce the Verzenio dosing frequency to once daily. The pharmacokinetics of Verzenio in patients with severe renal impairment (CLcr <30 mL/min), end stage renal disease, or in patients on dialysis is unknown. No dosage adjustments are necessary in patients with mild or moderate hepatic (Child-Pugh A or B) and/or renal impairment (CLcr ≥30-89 mL/min).

 

Please see full Prescribing Information for Verzenio.

 

AL HCP ISI 12OCT2021

 

Sincerely,

Suzanne Allen

Regional Oncology Account Manager-Great Plains

402-237-1038

Lilly USA, LLC

s.allen@lilly.com | www.lilly.com

Corporate Member Update: Oncopeptides- Melphalan Flufenamide (PEPAXTO®) Update

Melphalan Flufenamide (PEPAXTO®)
September, 2021

Permanent J-Code Assigned for Pepaxto® (melphalan flufenamide)

 

Effective, October 1, 2021
J9247
Injection, melphalan flufenamide, 1 mg1

To read the full press release, click here!

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda®

KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab)
August, 2021

Merck would like to inform you that the FDA has approved KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) Injection 100 mg for the treatment of patients with locally advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) that is not curable by surgery or radiation. This follows the 2020 approval of KEYTRUDA to treat patients with recurrent or metastatic cSCC that is not curable by surgery or radiation.

To read the full press release, please click here.

Corporate Member Update: Merck-WELIREG™ (belzutifan)

WELIREG™ (belzutifan)
September, 2021

Merck Product Launch

Merck would like to inform you that WELIREG™ (belzutifan) 40-mg tablets has received FDA approval. WELIREG is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease who require therapy for associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC), central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastomas, or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), not requiring immediate surgery.

To read the full press release, please click here!

Corporate Member Update: BeiGene- BRUKINSA® (zanubrutinib) New FDA Approvals

BRUKINSA® (zanubrutinib)
September, 2021

BRUKINSA® (zanubrutinib) capsules, for oral use – new FDA approvals

BeiGene USA, Inc. is happy to announce two new approvals of BRUKINSA® (zanubrutinib) capsules, for oral use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for the treatment of adult patients with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) (on August 31, 2021) and for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) who have received at least one anti-CD20-based regimen (on September 14, 2021). The MZL indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.1

Please see Important Safety Information below and click https://www.brukinsa.com/prescribing-information.pdf to access the Full Prescribing
Information for BRUKINSA.

To read the full press release, click here!

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda® and LENVIMA® Update

KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) and LENVIMA(® (lenvatinib)
September, 2021

Information about KEYTRUDA(R) (pembrolizumab) and LENVIMA(R) (lenvatinib)

Merck announces that KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), in combination with LENVIMA® (lenvatinib), has been approved by the FDA for first-line treatment of adult patients with advanced
renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

To read the full press release, click here!

Corporate Member Update-Seagen- Tivdak™ (tisotumab vedotin-tftv)

Tivdak™ (tisotumab vedotin-tftv)
October, 2021

Introducing a New Treatment Option for Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer


Seagen would like to announce the approval of Tivdak™ (tisotumab vedotin-tftv) for injection 40 mg, for intravenous use, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on September 20, 2021. Tivdak is a tissue factor-directed antibody and microtubule inhibitor conjugate indicated for the treatment of adult patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer with disease progression on or after chemotherapy.


This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and durability of response. Continued approval for this
indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

To read the full press release, please click here.

Corporate Member Update- Takeda- EXKIVITY™ (mobocertinib)

EXKIVITY™ (mobocertinib)
September, 2021

New Targeted Therapy for EGFR Exon 20 Insertion-Positive mNSCLC


Takeda Oncology is pleased to announce that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved EXKIVITY™ (mobocertinib), the first oral therapy to target epidermal growth factor
receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

To read the full press release, please click here.

Corporate Member Update: Regeneron-REGEN-COV™ (casirivimab and imdevimab)

REGEN-COV™ (casirivimab and imdevimab)
October, 2021

On September 9th, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated Regeneron’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to authorize an additional presentation of REGEN-COV™ (casirivimab and imdevimab) – specifically a co-packaged presentation of REGEN-COV that consists of individual vials of both casirivimab and imdevimab inside a single carton.

To read the full press release, click here.

Corporate Member Update: Boehringer Ingelheim, Inc.- COSELA™ (trilaciclib)

COSELA™ (trilaciclib)
September, 2021

G1 Therapeutics, Inc. secures permanent J Code for COSELA™ (trilaciclib). The code, J1448, is effective on October 1, 2021. Visit COSELA.com for more information.

Corporate Member Update: Merck- Keytruda® FDA Update

KEYTRUDA®
August, 2021

Merck would like to share that the FDA has approved KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) Injection 100mg for the treatment of patients with locally advanced sqaumous cell carcinoma (cSCC) that is not curable by rsurgery or radiation.

For more information, please review the complete press release here!

 

Corporate Member Update: Foundation Medicine

FoundationOne®Liquid CDx
July, 2021

Foundation Medicine has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for FoundationOne®Liquid CDx to be used as a companion diagnostic to aid in identifying patients with MET exon 14 skipping (METex14) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for whom treatment with TABRECTA® (capmatinib) may be appropriate. TABRECTA® is the first therapy approved by the FDA for adult patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors have an alteration that leads to METex14. FoundationOne Liquid CDx analyzes the largest genomic region of any FDA-approved comprehensive liquid biopsy test and was approved by the FDA in August 2020 to report genomic alteration results for patients with any solid tumor.

Please read the full press release for details.

 

Corporate Member Update: Foundation Medicine

July, 2021

On behalf of our Corporate Member Foundation Medicine, please join them for a discussion of comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP), common barriers to use, and how Foundation Medicine can help you implement CGP in your practice. Dr. Fadi Braiteh of Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada will be leading this virtual program open to all health care providers (medical assistants, researchers, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists and physicians).

Virtual Event Date: Wednesday, July 28th

Time : 10am CST or 5pm CST 

To Register*: Click here    *Attendance is limited to healthcare professionals only

To view the invitation, click here.

Corporate Member Update: FoundationOne®CDx Receives FDA-Approval as a Companion Diagnostic for ALUNBRIG® (brigatinib) to Identify Patients with ALK positive Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

FoundationOne®CDx
July, 2021

We have received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for FoundationOne®CDx to be used as a companion diagnostic for ALUNBRIG® (brigatinib), which is currently FDA-approved for the treatment of adult patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as detected by an FDA-approved test. FoundationOne CDx, the only FDA-approved tissue-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) test, is now able to detect ALK+ mNSCLC and identify patients who may be appropriate for treatment with ALUNBRIG which is approved as a first-line or later-line therapy.

 

Read the full press release for details.

Corporate Member Update: Bristol Myers Squibb

Opdivo® (nivolumab)
June, 2021

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Opdivo® (nivolumab) as Adjuvant Treatment of Completely Resected Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer in Patients who have Received Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

You can read more about Bristol Myers Squibb's recent FDA approval of Opdivo (nivolumab) for patients with Completely Resected Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer in Patients who have Received Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy by clicking on this link. The approval is based on results from the Phase 3 CheckMate -577 trial that evaluated Opdivo (n=532) compared to placebo (n=262) in esophageal or GEJ cancer patients with residual pathologic disease following neoadjuvant CRT and complete resection.

Corporate Member Update: ADC Therapeutics Announces FDA Approval of ZYNLONTA™ (loncastuximab tesirine-lpyl) in Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

ZYNLONTA™
May, 2021

ADC Therapeutics Announces FDA Approval of ZYNLONTA™ (loncastuximab tesirine-lpyl) in Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

First and only CD19-targeted antibody drug conjugate (ADC) as a single-agent treatment for adult patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

ZYNLONTA addresses an unmet need across a broad population of third-line (3L)+ r/r patients, including patients with DLBCL not otherwise specified, DLBCL arising from low grade
lymphoma and high-grade B-cell lymphoma.

ZYNLONTA demonstrated 48.3% overall response rate, 24.1% complete response rate anddurable responses in heavily pretreated patients in pivotal LOTIS-2 trial.

ADC Therapeutics SA announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ZYNLONTA™ (loncastuximab tesirine-lpyl) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) large B-cell lymphoma after two or more lines of systemic therapy, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) not otherwise specified (NOS), DLBCL arising from low grade lymphoma and high-grade B-cell lymphoma.1 ZYNLONTA, a CD19-targeted antibody drug conjugate (ADC), has been granted accelerated approval by the FDA based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Click here to continue reading the full press release...

Corporate Member Update: Oncopeptides- Melphalan Flufenamide (PEPAXTO®) now included in the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Multiple Myeloma Version 6.2021

PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide)
May, 2021

Melphalan Flufenamide (PEPAXTO®) now included in the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®)for Multiple Myeloma Version 6.2021 - April 12, 2021

Category 2A1

Definitions for National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Categories:

Category 2A: Based upon lower-level evidence, there is uniform NCCN consensus that the intervention is appropriate.

For more information go to www.PEPAXTOHCP.com

 

INDICATION

PEPAXTO is indicated in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of therapy and whose disease is refractory to at least one proteasome inhibitor, one immunomodulatory agent, and one CD38-directed monoclonal antibody. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Limitation of Use

PEPAXTO is not indicated and is not recommended for use as a conditioning regimen for transplant outside of controlled clinical trials.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

PEPAXTO is contraindicated in patients with a history of serious allergic reaction to melphalan flufenamide or melphalan.

PEPAXTO may cause thrombocytopenia, which may lead to hemorrhage. Monitor platelets at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Do not administer PEPAXTO if the platelet count is less than 50 x 109/L. Withhold PEPAXTO until platelet count is 50 x 109/L or greater and resume at same or reduced dose based on duration of interruption. Adjust dose and/or dose schedule based on signs and symptoms of bleeding.

PEPAXTO may cause neutropenia, which may lead to infection. Monitor neutrophil counts at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Do not administer PEPAXTO if absolute neutrophil count is less than 1 x 109/L. Withhold PEPAXTO until absolute neutrophil count is 1 x 109/L or greater and resume at same or reduced dose based on duration of interruption. Consider leukocyte growth factor as clinically appropriate. PEPAXTO may cause anemia. Monitor red blood cell counts at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Treat anemia as clinically indicated. Dosage modification and dose delay of PEPAXTO may be required to allow for recovery of red blood cells.

Patients taking PEPAXTO experienced infections, including fatal infections. Consider antimicrobials as clinically appropriate.

Nonclinical safety studies with melphalan flufenamide at dosages exceeding the recommended dose for PEPAXTO were associated with mortality. The safety and efficacy of PEPAXTO has not been established for use as a conditioning regimen in patients receiving transplant.

Secondary malignancies such as myelodysplastic syndromes or acute leukemia have been reported in patients with multiple myeloma who were treated with PEPAXTO. Monitor patients long term for the development of secondary malignancies.

Based on its mechanism of action, PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman because it is genotoxic and targets actively dividing cells. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 6 months after the last dose. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 3 months after the last dose.

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%; Grade 1-4) were fatigue (55%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (27%), pyrexia (24%), and respiratory tract infection (24%).

Special Considerations

Use in Pregnancy

Based on the mechanism of action, PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on PEPAXTO use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk. PEPAXTO is a genotoxic drug. Advise a woman of childbearing potential of the potential risks to the fetus.

Lactation

There is no information regarding the presence of melphalan flufenamide or its metabolites in human breast milk, or the effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 1 week after the last dose.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 6 months after the last dose.

PEPAXTO may damage the developing male germ cells, resulting in possible genetic fetal abnormalities. Advise males with a female partner of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 3 months after the last dose.

PEPAXTO can cause amenorrhea in premenopausal women and result in infertility. Based on findings of melphalan flufenamide in animals, PEPAXTO may impair male fertility. Alkylating drugs, such as PEPAXTO, can also cause irreversible testicular suppression in patients.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information

 

Reference 1: Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Multiple Myeloma V.6.2021, pages 4, 25. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed April 23, 2021. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way.

Corporate Member Update: Recent Change to Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for KEYTRUDA®

KEYTRUDA®
May, 2021

There has been a recent change to the Prescribing Information (PI) and Medication Guide for KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) injection 100 mg. The changes are detailed below.

The PI and Medication Guide for KEYTRUDA have been updated with the removal of the indication for the treatment of patients with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy and at least one other prior line of therapy. The indication, dosage, adverse reactions, and clinical trials information have been removed from section 1, section 2, section 6, and section 14 of the PI, and the indication has been removed from the “What is KEYTRUDA” section of the Medication Guide.

The updated PI and Medication Guide may be accessed from the following links:

Prescribing Information

Medication Guide

SELECTED INDICATIONS

KEYTRUDA, in combination with pemetrexed and platinum chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.
KEYTRUDA, in combination with carboplatin and either paclitaxel or paclitaxel protein-bound, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC.
KEYTRUDA, as a single agent, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with NSCLC expressing PD-L1 [tumor proportion score (TPS) ≥1%] as determined by an FDA-approved test, with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations, and is:
– stage III where patients are not candidates for surgical resection or definitive chemoradiation, or
– metastatic.
KEYTRUDA, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express
PD-L1 (TPS ≥1%) as determined by an FDA-approved test, with disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving KEYTRUDA.

EGFR=epidermal growth factor receptor; ALK=anaplastic lymphoma kinase; PD‑L1=programmed death ligand 1.

SELECTED SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

KEYTRUDA is a monoclonal antibody that belongs to a class of drugs that bind to either the programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) or the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, thereby removing inhibition of the immune response, potentially breaking peripheral tolerance and inducing immune-mediated adverse reactions. Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue, can affect more than one body system simultaneously, and can occur at any time after starting treatment or after discontinuation of treatment. Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed here may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.
Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Evaluate liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.
Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity of the immune-mediated adverse reaction. In general, if KEYTRUDA requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy.

  

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.4% (94/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including fatal (0.1%), Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (1.3%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 67% (63/94) of patients. Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 1.3% (36) and withholding in 0.9% (26) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 23% had recurrence. Pneumonitis resolved in 59% of the 94 patients.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may present with diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 1.7% (48/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (1.1%), and Grade 2 (0.4%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 69% (33/48); additional immunosuppressant therapy was required in 4.2% of patients. Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.5% (15) and withholding in 0.5% (13) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 23% had recurrence. Colitis resolved in 85% of the 48 patients.

Hepatotoxicity and Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

KEYTRUDA as a Single Agent

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 0.7% (19/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.4%), and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 68% (13/19) of patients; additional immunosuppressant therapy was required in 11% of patients. Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.2% (6) and withholding in 0.3% (9) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, none had recurrence. Hepatitis resolved in 79% of the 19 patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Adrenal Insufficiency

KEYTRUDA can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For Grade 2 or higher, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.8% (22/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.3%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 77% (17/22) of patients; of these, the majority remained on systemic corticosteroids. Adrenal insufficiency led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) and withholding in 0.3% (8) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Hypophysitis

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate hormone replacement as indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (17/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.2%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 94% (16/17) of patients; of these, the majority remained on systemic corticosteroids. Hypophysitis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.1% (4) and withholding in 0.3% (7) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Thyroid Disorders

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement for hypothyroidism or institute medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (16/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 2 (0.3%). None discontinued, but KEYTRUDA was withheld in <0.1% (1) of patients.
Hyperthyroidism occurred in 3.4% (96/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (0.1%) and Grade 2 (0.8%). It led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (2) and withholding in 0.3% (7) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement. Hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (237/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (0.1%) and Grade 2 (6.2%). It led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) and withholding in 0.5% (14) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement. The majority of patients with hypothyroidism required long-term thyroid hormone replacement.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM), Which Can Present With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Withhold KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Type 1 DM occurred in 0.2% (6/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA. It led to permanent discontinuation in <0.1% (1) and withholding of KEYTRUDA in <0.1% (1) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis With Renal Dysfunction

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated nephritis. Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 0.3% (9/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.1%), and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 89% (8/9) of patients. Nephritis led to permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA in 0.1% (3) and withholding in 0.1% (3) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, none had recurrence. Nephritis resolved in 56% of the 9 patients.  

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

KEYTRUDA can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, has occurred with anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes. Withhold or permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA depending on severity. Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions occurred in 1.4% (38/2799) of patients receiving KEYTRUDA, including Grade 3 (1%) and Grade 2 (0.1%) reactions. Systemic corticosteroids were required in 40% (15/38) of patients. These reactions led to permanent discontinuation in 0.1% (2) and withholding of KEYTRUDA in 0.6% (16) of patients. All patients who were withheld reinitiated KEYTRUDA after symptom improvement; of these, 6% had recurrence. The reactions resolved in 79% of the 38 patients.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received KEYTRUDA or were reported with the use of other anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions. Cardiac/Vascular: Myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; Nervous System: Meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; Ocular: Uveitis, iritis and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss; Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis, to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue: Myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae, including renal failure), arthritis (1.5%), polymyalgia rheumatica; Endocrine: Hypoparathyroidism; Hematologic/Immune: Hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection. 

Infusion-Related Reactions

KEYTRUDA can cause severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions, including hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis, which have been reported in 0.2% of 2799 patients receiving KEYTRUDA. Monitor for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion for Grade 1 or Grade 2 reactions. For Grade 3 or Grade 4 reactions, stop infusion and permanently discontinue KEYTRUDA.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic HSCT before or after anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute and chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments and allogeneic HSCT. Follow patients closely for evidence of these complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit vs risks of using anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatments prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Increased Mortality in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

In trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of KEYTRUDA to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of these patients with an anti–PD-1/PD-L1 treatment in this combination is not recommended outside of controlled trials.

Embryofetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action, KEYTRUDA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise women of this potential risk. In females of reproductive potential, verify pregnancy status prior to initiating KEYTRUDA and advise them to use effective contraception during treatment and for 4 months after the last dose. 

Adverse Reactions

In KEYNOTE-189, when KEYTRUDA was administered with pemetrexed and platinum chemotherapy in metastatic nonsquamous NSCLC, KEYTRUDA was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 20% of 405 patients. The most common adverse reactions resulting in permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA were pneumonitis (3%) and acute kidney injury (2%). The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) with KEYTRUDA were nausea (56%), fatigue (56%), constipation (35%), diarrhea (31%), decreased appetite (28%), rash (25%), vomiting (24%), cough (21%), dyspnea (21%), and pyrexia (20%).
In KEYNOTE-407, when KEYTRUDA was administered with carboplatin and either paclitaxel or paclitaxel protein-bound in metastatic squamous NSCLC, KEYTRUDA was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 15% of 101 patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients were febrile neutropenia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. Adverse reactions observed in KEYNOTE-407 were similar to those observed in KEYNOTE-189 with the exception that increased incidences of alopecia (47% vs 36%) and peripheral neuropathy (31% vs 25%) were observed in the KEYTRUDA and chemotherapy arm compared to the placebo and chemotherapy arm in KEYNOTE-407.
In KEYNOTE-042, KEYTRUDA was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 19% of 636 patients with advanced NSCLC; the most common were pneumonitis (3%), death due to unknown cause (1.6%), and pneumonia (1.4%). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of patients were pneumonia (7%), pneumonitis (3.9%), pulmonary embolism (2.4%), and pleural effusion (2.2%). The most common adverse reaction (≥20%) was fatigue (25%).
In KEYNOTE-010, KEYTRUDA monotherapy was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 8% of 682 patients with metastatic NSCLC; the most common was pneumonitis (1.8%). The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were decreased appetite (25%), fatigue (25%), dyspnea (23%), and nausea (20%).

Lactation

Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 4 months after the final dose.

 

Before prescribing KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), please read the Prescribing Information. The Medication Guide also is available.

Join Oncopeptides' Virtual Webcast- “African American Experience in Multiple Myeloma”

May, 2021

You are cordially invited to join the Oncopeptides Virtual Webcast titled “African American Experience in Multiple Myeloma” taking place on May 13, 2021 from 3-4 pm PDT/6-7 pm EDT.

This presentation will feature a panel of experts discussing key data around the African American Experience in Multiple Myeloma and strategies to remove disparities and barriers to care, followed by a Q&A session.  This is not a promotional event.

To confirm your participation and receive further updates, please complete your registration by CLICKING HERE.

 

Corporate Member Update: Bristol Myers Squibb

Opdivo® (nivolumab)
April, 2021

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Opdivo® (nivolumab) in Combination with Chemotherapy for Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer, Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer, and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma, Regardless of PD-L1 Expression

To read more about the approval, please visit our official press release page.

 

 

 

Corporate Member Update: Gilead- U.S. FDA GRANTS ACCELERATED APPROVAL TO TRODELVY® FOR THE TREATMENT OF METASTATIC UROTHELIAL CANCER

TRODELVY®
April, 2021

U.S. FDA GRANTS ACCELERATED APPROVAL TO TRODELVY® FOR THE TREATMENT OF METASTATIC UROTHELIAL CANCER
– Accelerated Approval Granted for Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Following a Platinum-Containing Chemotherapy and a PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitor – New Indication Marks Second FDA Approval for Trodelvy in 2021 –

Gilead Sciences, Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval of Trodelvy® (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) for use in adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (UC) who have previously received a platinum-containing chemotherapy and either a programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) or a programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitor.

Click this link to continue reaading this press release.

Corporate Member Update: Boehringer Ingelheim, Inc.-G1 Therapeutics and Boehringer Ingelheim Announce Commercial Availability of COSELA™ (trilaciclib)

COSELA™ (trilaciclib)
March, 2021

G1 Therapeutics and Boehringer Ingelheim Announce Commercial Availability of COSELA™ (trilaciclib)

 A new product was just approved by the FDA, and Boehringer Ingelheim is in a Co-Promotion with G1 Therapeutics. For more information please see the press release here and visit www.COSELA.com.

Corporate Member Update: BMS-U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Bristol Myers Squibb’s and bluebird bio’s Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel), the First Anti-BCMA CAR T Cell Therapy for Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel)
March, 2021

Bristol Myers Squibb and bluebird bio, Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel; ide-cel) as the first B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma after four or more prior lines of therapy, including an immunomodulatory agent, a proteasome inhibitor, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.

To read the rest of the press release, please click on the link.

Corporate Member Update: New Treatment Option for Some Patients With Triple-Class Refractory Multiple Myeloma

April, 2021

Oncopeptides would like to invite the Nebraska Oncology Society members to:

Discover a New Treatment Option for Some Patients With Triple-Class Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Join Oncopeptides on

• Tuesday, April 13 at 6pm ET or 8:30pm ET
• Wednesday, April 14 at 12pm ET or 3pm ET

for a live broadcast featuring Dr. Mikhael and Dr. Richter, who will discuss a newly approved therapy for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of
therapy and are triple-class refractory.

Click on this link for more information, or register here.

Corporate Member Update: Boehringer Ingelheim, Inc.-

treatments in squamous NSCLC
April, 2021

Boehringer Ingelheim invites the Nebraska Oncology Society members to the following event:

What Can We Learn About the Evolving Squamous NSCLC Treatment Landscape?
An Expert Discussion on Emerging Real-World Evidence

Click on the link for more information.

Corporate Member Update: Gilead-FDA APPROVES TRODELVY®

TRODELVY®
April, 2021

Gilead Sciences, Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted full approval to Trodelvy® (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) for adult patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who have received two or more prior systemic therapies, at least one of them for metastatic disease.

To read the full press release, please click here.

Corporate Member Update: Oncopeptides- FDA approval for PEPAXTO®

PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide)
March, 2021

FDA Approves Oncopeptides´ PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide) for Patients with Triple-Class Refractory Multiple Myeloma

March 1, 2021

—U.S. Commercial Launch Underway—

WALTHAM — March 1, 2021 — Oncopeptides AB (publ) (Nasdaq Stockholm: ONCO),  a global biotech company focused on the development of therapies for difficult-to-treat hematological diseases, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide), known during clinical development as melflufen, in combination with dexamethasone, for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of therapy and whose disease is refractory to at least one proteasome inhibitor, one immunomodulatory agent, and one CD38-directed monoclonal antibody. This indication has been granted under accelerated approval based upon the HORIZON trial. PEPAXTO is the first anticancer peptide-drug conjugate approved in multiple myeloma.

“While the treatment landscape for multiple myeloma has dramatically improved in recent years, once patients become resistant to existing classes of therapy they can face a very guarded prognosis,” said Paul G. Richardson, MD, Clinical Program Leader and Director of Clinical Research at the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “Research has shown melphalan flufenamide to be a novel and innovative therapeutic option, which is active in refractory disease and has manageable toxicity, with the convenience of being administered by infusion once a month. Based on our findings, melphalan flufenamide is an important addition to the treatment armamentarium, with the potential to meaningfully improve outcomes in an area of important unmet medical need.”

The HORIZON study, evaluating intravenous PEPAXTO in combination with dexamethasone, included heavily pre-treated patients with a poor prognosis. This multi-center single arm study evaluated 157 patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, of whom 97 were triple-class refractory and had received at least four prior lines of treatment. The Overall Response Rate for the patients within this group of patients with refractory multiple myeloma was 23.7 percent and the Median Duration of Response was 4.2 months. Of the subset of 97 patients, 41% had EMD (n=40), an aggressive and resistant disease associated with poor prognosis.

“We are proud to bring forward the first anticancer peptide-drug conjugate approved by the FDA for multiple myeloma,” said Jakob Lindberg, Chief Scientific Officer at Oncopeptides.  “PEPAXTO uses innovative technology that links a peptide carrier to a cytotoxic agent. The conjugated agent is a highly lipophilic compound, which allows it to be rapidly distributed into cells. The compound then leverages amino peptidases that are overexpressed in Multiple Myeloma cells, causing the release of the cytotoxic payload.”

Marty Duvall, Chief Executive Officer at Oncopeptides added, “The accelerated U.S. approval of PEPAXTO is a key step forward in fulfilling Oncopeptides’ core mission, to bring hope to patients in their battle against difficult-to-treat hematological diseases. Moving ahead, our focus is to further advance PEPAXTO.  We look forward to receiving top line data from the phase 3 OCEAN study in the second quarter.  This comparative study is designed to support a future supplementary New Drug Application to expand the label.”

PEPAXTO was approved under accelerated approval, which allows for earlier approval of drugs that treat serious conditions, and that fill an unmet medical need based on a surrogate endpoint. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Oncopeptides expects PEPAXTO to become commercially available in the U.S. within approximately two weeks.

About the HORIZON Study

In total, 157 multiple myeloma patients have been enrolled in the pivotal phase 2 HORIZON study, evaluating intravenous PEPAXTO in combination with dexamethasone. The approval was based on a subgroup of HORIZON patients (n=97) who had received at least four prior lines of therapy and whose disease is refractory to at least one proteasome inhibitor, one immunomodulatory agent, and one CD38-directed monoclonal antibody. In this subset of Triple Class Refractory patients, the Overall Response Rate (ORR) was 23.7 percent and Median Duration of Response (DOR) was 4.2 months.

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%; Grade 1-4) were fatigue (55%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (27%), pyrexia (24%), and respiratory tract infection (24%).  The most common laboratory abnormalities (Grade 1-4) were leukocytes decrease (99%), platelets decrease (99%), lymphocytes decrease (97%), neutrophils decrease (95%), hemoglobin decrease (84%), and creatinine increase (68%).

About Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell which produces antibodies to help fight infection. Multiple myeloma causes cancer cells to accumulate in the bone marrow. Approximately 7 per 100,000 Americans per year are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, making it a rare disease. A growing subset of this population is becoming triple-class refractory (TCR). The number of patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma is growing and the number of cases diagnosed annually is expected to almost double in 20 years. The average age for diagnosis is 70 years of age, and there is currently no cure.

About PEPAXTO®

PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide) is the first anticancer peptide-drug conjugate for patients with triple-class refractory Multiple Myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of therapy. PEPAXTO uses innovative technology that links a peptide carrier to a cytotoxic agent, resulting in a lipophilic compound. Due to its lipophilicity, PEPAXTO is distributed into cells.  PEPAXTO is designed to leverage aminopeptidases, which are overexpressed in multiple myeloma cells and cause the release of the cytotoxic agents. PEPAXTO is administered as a once monthly thirty-minute infusion.

INDICATION

PEPAXTO is indicated in combination with dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of therapy and whose disease is refractory to at least one proteasome inhibitor, one immunomodulatory agent, and one CD38-directed monoclonal antibody. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Limitation of Use

PEPAXTO is not indicated and is not recommended for use as a conditioning regimen for transplant outside of controlled clinical trials.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

PEPAXTO is contraindicated in patients with a history of serious allergic reaction to melphalan flufenamide or melphalan.

PEPAXTO may cause thrombocytopenia, which may lead to hemorrhage. Monitor platelets at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Do not administer PEPAXTO if the platelet count is less than 50 x 109/L. Withhold PEPAXTO until platelet count is 50 x 109/L or greater and resume at same or reduced dose based on duration of interruption. Adjust dose and/or dose schedule based on signs and symptoms of bleeding.

PEPAXTO may cause neutropenia, which may lead to infection. Monitor neutrophil counts at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Do not administer PEPAXTO if absolute neutrophil count is less than 1 x 109/L. Withhold PEPAXTO until absolute neutrophil count is 1 x 109/L or greater and resume at same or reduced dose based on duration of interruption. Consider leukocyte growth factor as clinically appropriate.

PEPAXTO may cause anemia. Monitor red blood cell counts at baseline, during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Monitor more frequently during the first 2 months of treatment with PEPAXTO. Treat anemia as clinically indicated. Dosage modification and dose delay of PEPAXTO may be required to allow for recovery of red blood cells.

Patients taking PEPAXTO experienced infections, including fatal infections. Consider antimicrobials as clinically appropriate.

Nonclinical safety studies with melphalan flufenamide at dosages exceeding the recommended dose for PEPAXTO were associated with mortality. The safety and efficacy of PEPAXTO has not been established for use as a conditioning regimen in patients receiving transplant.

Secondary malignancies such as myelodysplastic syndromes or acute leukemia have been reported in patients with multiple myeloma who were treated with PEPAXTO. Monitor patients long term for the development of secondary malignancies.

Based on its mechanism of action, PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman because it is genotoxic and targets actively dividing cells. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 6 months after the last dose. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 3 months after the last dose.

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%; Grade 1-4) were fatigue (55%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (27%), pyrexia (24%), and respiratory tract infection (24%).

Special Considerations

Use in Pregnancy

Based on the mechanism of action, PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on PEPAXTO use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk. PEPAXTO is a genotoxic drug. Advise a woman of childbearing potential of the potential risks to the fetus.

Lactation

There is no information regarding the presence of melphalan flufenamide or its metabolites in human breast milk, or the effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 1 week after the last dose.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

PEPAXTO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 6 months after the last dose.

PEPAXTO may damage the developing male germ cells, resulting in possible genetic fetal abnormalities. Advise males with a female partner of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PEPAXTO and for 3 months after the last dose.

PEPAXTO can cause amenorrhea in premenopausal women and result in infertility. Based on findings of melphalan flufenamide in animals, PEPAXTO may impair male fertility. Alkylating drugs, such as PEPAXTO, can also cause irreversible testicular suppression in patients.

Please find the full prescribing information available for viewing here: https://pepaxto.com/docs/pepaxto_pi.pdf

About Oncopeptides

Oncopeptides is a global biotech company committed to developing targeted therapies for patients facing hard-to-treat hematological diseases. Oncopeptides has one U.S. FDA approved product, PEPAXTO® (melphalan flufenamide), known during clinical development as melflufen. PEPAXTO is approved for patients with triple-class refractory multiple myeloma and was evaluated in several clinical studies including the pivotal Phase 2 HORIZON study and is currently being evaluated in the confirmatory Phase 3 OCEAN study. Oncopeptides’ headquarters is in Stockholm, Sweden, with a U.S. headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts. In addition to Boston, Oncopeptides has a footprint in Los Altos, California, another U.S. biotech hub. For more information, please visit our corporate website at https://oncopeptides.se/en/. You may also visit our U.S. website at https://www.oncopeptides-us.com/en and follow us on our U.S. social media channels,  Twitter and LinkedIn.

PEPAXTO® is a trademark of Oncopeptides AB (publ).

For more information, please contact:

Sarah Connors, Head of U.S. Communications, Oncopeptides, Inc.
E-mail: sarah.connors@oncopeptides.com
Cell phone: 508-654-2277

Linda Holmström, Director Investor Relations, Oncopeptides AB (publ)
E-mail: linda.holmstrom@oncopeptides.com
Cell phone: + 46 70 873 40 95

Corporate Member Update: BMS-U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Bristol Myers Squibb’s Breyanzi (lisocabtagene maraleucel), a New CAR T Cell Therapy for Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Large B-cell Lymphoma

Breyanzi (lisocabtagene maraleucel)
February, 2021

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Bristol Myers Squibb’s Breyanzi (lisocabtagene maraleucel), a New CAR T Cell Therapy for Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Large B-cell Lymphoma

Exciting news for adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma!   

BMS Press Release

PDF Press Release

Corporate Member Update- BMS: U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves OPDIVO® (nivolumab) in Combination with CABOMETYX® (cabozantinib) as First-line Treatment for Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

OPDIVO® (nivolumab)
January, 2021

Corporate Member Update: Takeda- New indication in a CML therapy

ICLUSIG
January, 2021

Takeda's ICLUSIG is now FDA-approved for the treatment of adult patients with chronic phase (CP-) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with resistance or intolerance to at least 2 prior TKIs. The dosing strategy and safety profiel have also been updated. Please read the following for additional information.

ICLUSIG New Indication Document

Or visit their website at https://www.iclusig.com/

 
 
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